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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
jarrett in for bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom.". >> i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum the senate gavels in at 11:00 a.m. we'll see if there was some miracle overnight. gregg: i doubt that. yesterday, republican senate leader mitch mcconnell made an emergency call to the vice president joe biden in an evident to jump-start negotiations. heather: if no deal is haed out today, majority leader reid says he will call a vote on a separate white house plan that reflects's original proposal. gregg: chief correspondent mike emanuel kicks off the coverage. mike, where do the things stand in the fiscal cliff talks at this critical late-stage? >> reporter: gregg, there seems to be some hope that conversations between vice president joe biden and senator mitch mcconnell can produce a deal. aides say the two men spoke multiple times last night and will continue working toward a solution. mcconnell called the vice. president bush: after weighing 18 hours from senate majority leader harry reid who seemed to throw in the towel. >> there is still significant difference between two
the opportunity and skirted up. -- screwed it up. >> we have two chinese immigrant families representing america. it is hard to imagine it in reverse from the chinese side. they're not an immigrant-based society. >> do they take it as an honor? >> yes. they also want to claim him. you know, as part of the greater china community. and then there is a bit of a disappointment, but it is an amazing moment in american history. >> i guess you want over there just before or after the big confrontation in august over the debt crisis. what has been their view of how our political system is working, whether we are worthy partner? >> the views of a top chinese government leaders is to have great confidence in the u.s. economy. they have made those statements to the top american leaders that have gone, all the way from vice president biden, and xi jinping met with president obama in february of last year. they expressed great confidence in united states. they're always asking about how the recovery is going. they believe that we will get our fiscal house in order. they know how dependent they are, and that
-term investments here. at the same time, we do not start of what has been so much a part of america's -- do not starve so much of what has been a part of america's history, our willingness to invest in the future, and that includes children, poor children, modern infrastructure, basic and blue sky research. when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next few weeks, i think that is going to be a broader challenge we face over the next decade. >> i think we have time for one more question. over here. as the question is coming, i want to say how much we support the president in this fight on ensuring the balance, and the president has been very strong on that issue. >> richard singer. we are a biomedical company that helps nurses and doctors, may collaborate better with social media. we got a small amount of the innovation funding, but it is a broader question about the health care ecosystem. if the company goes under, all the software engineers get new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech, we have a lot of people with ph.d.s, longer-term and specialized types of areas, and we do
, lake -- [inaudible] actually it's a wonderful part of america. here we have two chinese immigrant families representing america. it's hard to imagine it in reverse from the chinese side. but then they are not in the great society. >> do they take it as an honor? >> and deep. as ambassador locke mentioned they want to claim him and steve chu as part of the greater chinese community when they start talking about human rights or disagree with him on climate change. but nonetheless it's an amazing moments in american history. >> you went over there just before or just after the big confrontation in august of 2011 over the debt crisis here and there is so much concern whether china would continue to surface our debts and by our investment, treasury bond. i was just wondering, what is the mayor theo up our political system is working and whether our economy, whether we are a worthy partner i guess. >> abuse in the top chinese government leaders as they have great confidence in the economy and know how strong it is. they've made statements to the south american leaders that have gone all
're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreeme
cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>teve: this is probably going to bug you, people of afghanistan are supposed to be allies, right. >> brian: not according to their president karzai. listen. >> policies coming to us from terrorism and the taliban. it is partly coming to us from the structures that nato and traded in afghanistan. >> brian: our time and mon yesacrifices are a waste? >> steve: joining us is the army veteran for america. good morning to you. president karzai is blaming united states and nato for violence and corruption in afghanistan. he sounds a little >> yes, it is a nice posen pill to look at. i was in a
there that makes of america. the more we reflect the middle, the better off our committee will be and i think the service we provide will be better. >> what gives you that hope? >> a lot of people are recognizing the pathway we are on will not help. more and more members are talking with me where we discuss with one another how we can improve the place. i hear it almost every day. i encourage it. >> there are people who believe partisanship is a good thing because ideology and the direction of the country moves in the way they want. for example, people have come in with the tea party. what do you think of these hyper-partisan groups outside of the congress that attempt to exert their influence? >> one of the more fascinating experience i have had involves a gathering. my first meeting a couple years ago, with tea party types. my staff was concerned about this new group. i said, give me their telephone numbers. i invited them to our session. they were there that evening to express their concern about health care being nationalized and taking over that piece of their personal life. they were no
specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will help you get started today. >>> look at shares of bank of america. 1015 is where it is trading right now. firmly above $10 mark. watch for a firm close above 10 and that will give them hope that perhaps they can stay and go higher at this point. watching the stock along with other bank stocks off of news from citigroup. citi laying off 11,000 people. >> starbucks card for the 1% has arrived. at least that is what some are calling the new $450 starbucks gift card made from steel. it comes loaded with 400 bucks, cost $50 to make and only 5,000 of them will be sold exclusively through luxury online retailer gilt.com and that sale starts friday in case you wanted to buy one. >> i think i probably will. >> really? >> 50 bucks to make a steel card? >> you get $400 worth of coffee. >> it cost $450. it cost $50 to make the card. >> can you get -- i assume you can get it replenished? >> that's a good question. >> if you want to use it again. >> i'll probably pass. steel card is heavy. >> i was thinking about how much it would weigh in your pocket. >> maybe by u.s.
silence except for the television. it is america's biggest problem. and on that cheerful note, thank you very much. [applause] >> next, and to raise with to retiring members of congress. dan burton of indiana talks about his 30 years in congress. followed by senator kent conrad on his 26-year career. and a discussion on corporations and stock values. dan burton is retiring from the house this year after 30 years in office. the 15-term congressman represents the fifth district in east central indiana which includes parts of indianapolis and the surrounding suburbs. earlier he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the collective demonstration and the oversight ruled congress. this is 30 minutes. as you exit the institution how would you say it stated? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. he had someone take his place and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we bec
newman on the november jobs report and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy director. washington journal begins live each morning, 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care, and all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating, and you got to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? and of course, now we've got these reports saying, 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? when we step back 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures, this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care name. by unaccountable" on c-span 2. >> writer institute. i think a writer's institute is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices, words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision thi
in this country. we're generating jobs that are in america and a proves america's competitive position. -- and it improves america's competitive position. to me that should be a high priority. >> i would like to conclude with a question on your tenure. 26 years in the senate. he made the point that we now -- you made the point that we now have a partisan divide that is pretty vicious. from your experience, what can be done? what can be done and work for them that would correct the bitter partisan divide and allow the two parties to work together in the national interest on a more regular basis? >> one thing that would help is to elect more centrists. second, if the two parties met together in caucuses periodically. right now both sides caucus every week. most of that is focused on partisan advantage. i think it would be enormously useful if there were caucuses focused on the senate because of size where all senators met periodically in a caucus setting without the benefit of the media. i'm sorry. i think as we caucus now behind closed doors, i think a meeting of senators -- republicans
in little america of the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it
just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducinbankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. >> gretchen: 16 minutes after the top of the hour. if you are just waking up. it is usually a symbol of pride and patriotism. but the new flag polls seen in iran have a sinister meaning. the flag poles are electronic attenas used to jam communication and block their citizens from getting internet tv and radio signals. why? here with more is disa. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> gretchen: you have inside sources in the country of iran, why would they wanting to fool their citizens as to the real mission of the flag poles. >> the biggest threat to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube
that. republicans are holding hostage the middle class in america so that the wealthy don't have to pay their fair share. it is the republicans who are willing to let millions of americans rely upon an informant and insurance, to have that ended for them in just a few short days, people who have been out of work for over six months. republicans are holding them also. it is a manufactured crisis. what we are here to say is, first of all, i hope all of you agree with me, but no deal is better than a bad deal. no deal is better than a deal -- >> we'll take you back to the capitaol now. live coverage on c-span. >> yeah, right here. right here. right here, trust me, right here. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] if we get a deal, who will supply the champagne? >> republicans. they have all the money. >> are all watching somewhere. >> there's one. >> i am going to look for -- back.e rigtht >> senator mccain? can i talk to you out here for a second? [laughter] >> can we quote you on this? >> a man walks up to a podiu
from terrorism. part of the insecurity is coming to us from the structures that america created in afghanistan in the private security firms. the contractors that they promoted at the cost of afghan people. and the way they behaved with afghan people and the anger that has caused in the afghan people, and the resulting insecurity. >> would you say you believe that some of these would be intentional insecurity brought by nato in the united states? >> there is a very strong perception that some of that insecurity is intentional, yes. >> reporter: and when i asked him if he trusted the united states' motives in afghanistan he said, once bitten, twice shy. natalie? >> thanks so much, atia. >>> a new york city homeless man has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of a man pushed in front of a subway train. 30-year-old naeem davis is being held without bail. he served two years in prison for robbery. on wednesday, the victim's family spoke out. his daughter says she wishes someone had helped her father off the tracks but said, quote, what is done is done. >>> a candle l
. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to america, across europe and asia. and ultimately it came to no avail. .. >> it was 20 years after a very bloody partition, and it was a time in government that was a time of great possibility. the country's first constitution was written in 1973. the last land reform you had done were carried out in that period. you had an incredibly progressive government. i just came from england doing a talk there, and it was in the 1970s that marital rape or earlier was considered a crime, but it was something, like, 1984 before the united king dome deemed marital rape a crime. there was a progressive period, not to say it was without fault. certainly, it was made, errors made, grievance ones, in his time. there was the first ever islamic conference, and it was a source of great pride for pakistanis, and they were asked to open up their homes for delegates combing from all over the world, open their home, and make space for them. they had to open their homes because many came uninvited, and there was a substantial entourage that required more sp
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
that he was here had an impact. we were in the war whether churchill came are not keeping america was a raging against the japanese. not the germans. then hitler made the dunderheaded decision to declare war on the united states when he did not have to. churchill realized what that would mean if the americans looked to your first. the policy of germany first, then japan had be worked out, which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans like to churchill. >> his mom was american. >> his mom was american. he was well-known on the lecture circuit. now here he is prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing americans took a liking to him because they were very wary -- and still were many -- that all they wanted were the colonies back. not liberty. not war freedoms. to recapture everything the japanese had taken from them by using american boys. and that americans resented. they were wary of that. as well as george marshall. >> we are about out of time. when did you finish this? >> this is about -- early this ye
. >>> 7:23. where is the smartest city in north america? one website says san francisco is the second smartest city. san francisco has a lining entrepreneurial economy -- this rhining entrepreneur economy, the report says, but they say it is near colleges and universities. behind san francisco are seattle and vancouver. >>> 7:23. we want to check in with sal. see what's happening on the roads. sal? >> yeah. boston has harvard. >> right. >> let's take a look at what we have. it's cambridge, technically. but you know what i mean. southbound 880, we have slow traffic. we also have slow traffic on the bridges. but not so much on the san mateo bridge as we did yesterday. we want to talk about contra costa county because highway 4 has improved from antioch to pittsburg but slow in bay point. 24 is not that bad. it's crowded, though. and thin 80 westbound in western contra costa county slow in richmond as you drive down to berkeley. if you are driving in san jose, we have slow traffic here coming up from downtown. it's very slow driving up to the 17 interchange and beyond that into cupertino
temperature-wise. in tokyo we're looking at 12 degrees. over towards the americas still things are very messy across much of the southwest. this is due to this winter storm system, and it is going to be a very heavy snowmaker. that will be moving into the four corners. welcoming rain will perhaps be in the phoenix region, but the mountainside will perhaps see about 30 centimeters of snowfall in nevada and new mexico. colorado, you may see more than that, and southern california you'll still see those rain but higher elevations will possibly pack up 5 centimeters of snowfall. across much of the southeast, things are looking very clear and the temperatures are rising here in chicago. that's well above your average. in fact, people in chicago actually broke the record for the longest stretch with no measurable snowfall. you haven't seen snow since rch 4 lt year, so 283 days of no snow. we're wondering when that snow will start there, but freezing rain has impacted paris. it was a slippery day for us out there. still a slippery thing. look at this video. freezing rain creates icy roads yesterday,
. the number of poor people in france has grown quite markedly. everyone should make a sacrifice. in america during world war ii, the marginal tax rate was 91%. >> using the people are going to follow depardieu's example? >> there are quite a few people who are leaving france. the last figures we had were in 2010. 710 people left france for tax reasons. within europe, which is meant to be united, you have big tax competition within countries. to attracting wealthy people in belgium. the same can apply to great britain which tries to attract the very rich people. at the same time, they're cutting the deficits and taxing. public spending in france's biggest, but it is one reason why household consumption is down and why we have a recession. you have to take all of that into account. depardieu is complaining about different tax system that has subsidized the french film industry which has made him wealthy and successful. >> a good point. jock, good point. -- jacques, good point. two nasa spacecraft will crash into the service of the moon. it is the planned end to the mission to look at the grav
and get ambulances in. it's a mess. gregg: we are live from "america's newsroom" to elizabeth prann. elizabeth? >> reporter: hi, gregg. yeah, very unusual time of year for such destructive storms. in fact damaging tornados across the southeast. strong winds as far as texas. folks were celebrating their christmas evening as storms left00 of thousands of without power at any given time. the system moved through parts of alabama, georgia, mississippi and parts of florida. the biggest city to be hit by numerous rare winter twisters as well as powerful straight line winds. forecasters say there could have been as many as 19 tornados that ripped through the area. trees and power lines are on the ground, leaving debris in the roadway. folks in texas are feeling from where parts of the system originated. >> i tell you what. i never seen one in real life. just to hear one from that far away, that is a mile from where we are and you could still hear it. it was pretty amazing. >> as far as i know there is a small town, maybe 10 miles from here, lovelady. blew the roof off of a bank into anothe
, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should trust social media in general, dennis. >> a big lead-in there such a powerful medium. seeing it, of course, by this very example. right now, people, they don't feel comforcomfortable. but compelled to do it any watch behavior, as much as people talk about they don't like it, people use it putting more and more information online via social networks. i think there's a strange dichotomy about what we think we want and what we actually do. for most people, they don't square but doesn't matter. >> all would be academic
helped win world war ii and how dogs like bo obama still have a special place in america. the author of "dogs of war" is here. she'll tell us which dog actually had a military rank. >> did you call him bo obama? >> that's his name. >> and fire in the sky. a fireball streaking across the texas sky has people buzzing. and nasa explaining that. but first, "gangnam style" goes to washington after the singer is forced to apologize for anti-american lyrics from years ago. that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by making it without 100% real cheddar cheese. but then...it wouldn't be stouffer's mac & cheese. just one of over 70 satisfying recipes for one from stouffer's. to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] afla
be the biggest concern for the united states of america, if it spreads across boundaries and al qaeda of the islamic maghreb will be a continuing problem throughout africa. thank you very much. >> senator isakson i'm always thankful for your partnership and the way our staffs work together for these hearings. forgive us, it is past left vending our appointed hour. all your testimony, your written testimony will be submitted for the record. there were several or the senators who expressed real interest in this hearing today but due to their sqed us were unable to join us. i will leave the record open for a week which will allow senators to address questions to any of our witnesses and take some actions going forward. i'm grateful for the support of efforts that made it possible for us to get a grateful discussion of many challenging issues facing the united states in the region and in mali. thanks for joining us. dr. dr. fomunyoh and miss dufka and thank you for your testimony today. we're grateful for your testimony and with that this hearing is adjourned. >> the labor department toda
of america when he was arrested? >> he was krosting the border. >> ten feet away from america? >> or less. >> his friend was released but johnny was brought to this jail in matamoras, mexico. his parents were told the jail is largely controlled by mexican drug cartel members. a few nights after he was imprisoned his parents got a call from someone threatening to kill their son unless they paid money. >> to then he said i have your son. he said, i'm going to f him up. he said, i already have. for some stupid reason my response was oh, no. i'm going to call the consulate. and he put johnny on the phone, and i just -- i couldn't believe it. i just -- then i realized, i was like, oh, my god. i really thought he wasn't in the prison. i thought someone has taken him out of the prison. i just couldn't conceive of this going on in a government facility. >> olivia, what did johnny tell you. >> he said, mom, you need to do whatever they say. he said, they're really serious. >> they never heard tfrom the caller again, although the u.s. consulate has known about this from the beginning they kept the
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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